WheelWorks Wheel Tire Fit Fitment Test Tool Instructional Video Overview How To

WheelWorks Wheel Tire Fit Fitment Test Tool Instructional Video Overview How To


Hello, I’m Scott Blair. I’m the inventor of the Wheel Fit Test Fit
Tool. I wanna thank you for purchasing your Wheel
Fit Ultimate Kit or your Pro Kit. This instructional video will show you how
to assemble either of your kits, talk about all the dimensions of the tool, and why things
are the way they are. And then, we’re gonna discuss how to use them
on different types of suspensions. Behind this instructional video is an educational
portion that will discuss all the terminology and dimensions needed for you to build your
custom wheel accurately and be able to communicate effectively with the manufacturer. Our phone number and website are at the end
of the video. If you have any technical questions, please
give us a call. Let’s get started. We’re gonna get started with the faceplates
first. If you purchased a Pro 45 Kit, your kit will
have this faceplate right here. You’ll notice that this faceplate will fit
your common 4-Lug and 5-Lug applications. It has a small [inaudible 00:01:27] a little
bit, from 4-100 up to 4-130 millimeters, and 5-100 up to around 505. Whatever lug nuts were on the vehicle, that’s
what will work with your tool. Now, if you’re working on an early ’60s or
’70s GM car or truck that had seven-sixteenth studs, you’ll wanna maybe use a washer over
the stud to give the lug nut a little more room to seat, because the lug nuts tend to
be a little bit small, and they may tend to sink down into the lug hole. This faceplate will also fit over the large
five-eighth studs, common on your pro street and full race applications as well. If you purchased a Pro 56 kit, you’ve got
the 5- and 6-Lug faceplate that will fit all the way up to 5-150 and 6, on five and a half. If you purchased an ultimate kit, you’ll have
both the 4- and 5-Lug and the 5- and 6-Lug faceplates. We also offer an 8-Lug faceplate for three-quarter
ton trucks. As for your vertical extensions, the Wheel
Fit will extend from 14 inches to 20 inches in tire bead diameter. It does that by adjusting the bolt holes right
through here and matching them up to the holes in the faceplate. Fourteen is here near the top, and 20 is here
at the bottom. We also offer optional extensions that will
go from 21 inch to 28 inch in tire bead diameter. You’ve got a pair of long horizontal extensions. There’s a series of peaks and valleys along
this part. Each of the peaks and valleys represents a
half of an inch. The tool will start off at six and a half
inches in width and will extend all the way up to 16. You’ll also notice that there is an adjustable
B-clamp on the tool and you loosen it up by the Phillips head screw from underneath. You place this tool onto your tire bead and
then secure this screw so that the tool will grasp the tire that you’re looking to test
fit. Also notice, this horizontal piece has an
engraved ruler mark. This ruler mark indicates your back side setting,
as well as, the overall width that the tool is set up at. Now, here we have the short horizontal extension. Again, it has an adjustable bead clamp that
can be loosened and tightened from the screw underneath. This part will sit on top of the long horizontal,
and this tooth underneath it is what fits into the valley on the long horizontal. This is how it stays secure in its width,
while you’re adjusting your offset. Now that you know about the individual parts,
let me show you how to assemble it in an actual tire. The first thing that you’re gonna do is take
the horizontal extensions, place ’em over the bead of the tire, hold the bead clamp
firmly against the tire bead, and then, start turning on the screw until it tightens up. And let the tool grasp the tire bead firmly. Now that we’ve set all of our bead clamps,
let’s assemble the tool so that it can be placed inside the tire. The first thing that you wanna do is install
your short vertical extension into the bottom of the long horizontal extension. And then, place the short horizontal extension
on top of that so that they line up. Next, use your quarter by 20 bolt that’s supplied,
thread it through the hole in both of the grooves, and then secure it with one of the
black knobs. Once you’ve done that, take another bolt and
secure it between just the two horizontal pieces and use a wingnut to put it together. This is important. By using this bolt and wingnut to secure both
horizontal pieces together, that allows us to loosen the knob and adjust our backside
setting, completely independently of the width. Okay, I’ve got the other half put together,
and what I like to do is place the two parts on top of each other so that I know that they
look identical. This means I’ve got the exact same width and
the exact same backside setting set up on both halves of the tool. Here’s something that can be useful for you. With the wheel bit, you can take the vertical
extension, which I have with the short leg pointing toward the street. You can actually loosen up your knob and flip
this around the other way. So if I needed a very high offset wheel, I
can actually take the short leg, point it toward the rear, and be able to move the offset
further toward the street, gaining more flexibility in the tool. So I’ve set the tool up with the short leg
pointing toward the street, but I can just as easily have turned it around and had it
pointing toward the inside, and then move forward for more clearance, more higher offset,
whichever the case may be. I just simply would’ve taken the nut and the
bolt that holds the two horizontal pieces together and moved it to the other side to
give myself plenty of room to move up and down the length of the tool for maximum benefit. And then, take advantage of all of the options
in offsets that are available, within the constraints of the tool. Once I have one-half of the tool assembled
and put together, I assemble the other half and make it look exactly identical to this
half. I set it at the same width and the same backside
setting. In our example, we’re gonna set the tool up
for a 9-inch wheel, which means that the tool will be set for a 10-inch wide overall width,
and we’re gonna use a very common 4-inch backside setting. Okay, now that we know that we have both halves
of the tool identical, we’re gonna bolt one-half up to the faceplate. So we’ve chosen the correct faceplate for
our application. We’re gonna bring both bolts from the rear. We’re gonna take one-half of the tool, place
it in the correct diameter, which in this case is 18 for this tire, and secure it with
the wingnuts. Also, something I wanna mention right here. This is very important. As you see here on our tool, when the vertical
extension lines up with the ruler mark, the back of the vertical extension is not your
backside setting. Your backside setting is where the tool makes
contact with the vehicle. In this case, our faceplates are exactly one-half
inch thick. So right here, the back of our vertical extension
is lined up at four and a half inches. We subtract the one-half inch for the faceplate. You can imagine a vertical plane coming up
and intersecting our ruler mark, which in this case would be four inches. Make sure that you remember to do that. If you happen to need to stack some spacers
behind the faceplate to clear a large brake caliber, just remember ever how many spacers
that you stack behind the faceplate, subtract that much more off your backside setting so
that you’ve got an accurate fitment. Okay, now that we have everything assembled,
let’s set our tire back up here. I prefer to install the tool into my tire
with the tire laying flat. Watch this technique. I think you’ll find it very easy. We’re gonna take the part of the tool that
includes the faceplate, and we’re gonna go ahead and install it into the tire. I’m gonna have to spread the beads just slightly
to make it fit. Now, because we set our bead clamps earlier,
it’s nice and snug, and it’s not falling out of the tire. Now, I’m gonna get the other half of the tool
and get it ready to slide in, just like this. And here’s what I like to do. Go in at an angle, spread the beads apart. Take one bolt, come in from the rear of the
faceplate. Move the two parts, offset to each other slightly,
until they line up. Push the first bolt through, and then rotate
it back into place, like this, and then secure it with the wingnuts, like so. Now that we’ve done that, it’s good and snug
inside the tire. It’s not gonna go anywhere. And when we bolt it to the vehicle, we’ll
move that backside setting back and forth like we want to, to determine the exact fitment
to make the widest tire possible fit, without rubbing. Let’s go put it on the car. Okay, I’ve moved the car out of the garage
onto the driveway to demonstrate that the tool is designed to be used in this type of
an environment. You don’t need any special tools. You don’t have to have a lift. You work with the car right on the ground,
okay? I’ve got the tire and the tool already clamped
together, as we did earlier, and we’re gonna bolt it to the car. And I’m gonna demonstrate how to use the tool
on the car to change your backside setting and be able to determine how much tire that
you can actually get on that application. Okay, now we’ve got our wheel off. We’re gonna place our jack underneath the
lower control arm so that we can set the car at the right height. And then, we’re gonna place in our jack stand
as a safety device, in case our main jack fails. The Wheel Fit Tool is not designed to support
the weight of the vehicle. It is a measuring tool only. Only use a lug wrench to snug fit the lug
nuts onto the Wheel Fit Tool. Don’t use an impact gun. And now, to place our safety jack. Okay, we’ve got the Wheel Fit bolted up to
our vehicle. Now, I’ve set this tool up purposefully with
a low offset, knowing that this car takes a high offset, to demonstrate how you adjust
it on the vehicle. Now, before we get started, I’ve got a small
bottle jack underneath the lower control arm, as you can see here, and I also have a jack
in place. In case my small bottle jack were to fail
for some reason, I’ve got a safety catch. Now I’ve got it bolted up on the vehicle. You can see, with this offset, that I’ve got
a lot of tire sticking outside the fender well. If this was your application and you’re working
on, if you turn the wheels lock to lock right here, or rotate 360 degrees, you’re gonna
find that the tire’s gonna rub and bump into the inner, the fender well here…probably,
back here. So even though this is over-exemplified, you
get to understand what I’m trying to accomplish here, to demonstrate. Now, the correct offset on this particular
application is a high positive. So what I’m gonna do is I’m gonna reach in
and I’m gonna loosen the two knobs that we demonstrated earlier. And in doing so, I can move the tool back,
and go to a higher offset, and pull the tire back up underneath the vehicle. Now, when I get it exactly where I need to,
I can take, and I can turn the wheel lock to lock, rotate this tire. And at that point, I can check my clearances
on the inside and on the outside. When everything fits exactly the way you want,
look at the side of the tool and that ruler mark will tell you exactly where the backside
setting needs to be to build your wheel.

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