How to Service Mongoose Fat Bike Hubs (improved audio)

How to Service Mongoose Fat Bike Hubs (improved audio)


hello and welcome back to the Mongoose
miniseries today we’ll be going through episode three and I’m going to be
showing you guys how to disassemble and lubricate the hubs
on your new monitors now I’m going to demonstrate it on a rear wheel or ever
the process is the exact same for the front wheel it’s actually a little bit
easier because you don’t have to remove the freewheel on the front so let’s get
right to it so we’re gonna start with the rear wheel because it is the more
difficult of the two you are going to need a special tool to get to the hub
and it is one of these it is a free wheel Cosette Fuller they’re really
cheap you can usually get them at any local bike shops or you can even order
them online for under about five ten dollars in conjunction with that you’re
going to need an adjustable wrench big enough to fit on there and what we got
to do is we’ve actually got to take the freewheel off now if you’ve been riding
your bike for a while this thing could be on there super super tight and that’s
because as its turning it actually tightens itself on I already broke this
one loose so it shouldn’t be too hard to remove however if you are having
difficulty with this process try getting a piece of pipe sticking on to the end
of your wrench and then trying to turn it with that extra level stick it down
inside there and it fits into a bunch of splines in there I’ll show you in a sec so now we have access to the hub right
here and we’re gonna take that apart we’re gonna grease it and then we’ll go
back together with it okay so the removal of the spindle through the hub
is actually very similar to removing the spindle in the bottom bracket however
you’re gonna need two tools you’re gonna need a 15 millimeter cone wrench and
it’s a very thin wrench if you have a super thin regular wrench that’ll work
too and then you’re gonna need a 17 millimeter wrench and one thing I
suggest is to wear padded gloves because those cone wrenches can really dig into
your hand and you actually hurt yourself if you’re not
careful so they just kind of take that job you’re gonna do is you’re gonna grab
this flat right here just above the hub and then you’re gonna come up here and
sometimes these there we go sometimes those can be really tight and
if that’s the case you can do that same thing with the cheater bar and try to
work it around with extra leverage now that we’ve got this loose we’re gonna
completely take this nut off this is just a spacer that’s gonna come off too
and then what we need to do is we need to remove this where you first use that
cone wrench that is actually gonna come out from the center of the hub all the
way out and you’ll see I’ll show you in a sec okay so once you’ve got that loose
you’ll actually see down here there are a bunch of loose bearings and I use a
little magnet to pop them out of there so see there’s these little loose
bearings here don’t lose any because if you do you’re gonna have to go find some
more probably at a bike shop so once you’ve got those out you can
then pull the spindle through and it’ll let the bearings come out from the other
side okay so once you get to the other side you need to be extremely careful
that you don’t get grease onto your rotor if you want to be extra safe you
can take the rotor off before you do this I’ve never really had an issue so I
just leave it on once you’ve got those all completely out you can then take and
just pull this right out once you’ve got everything removed the bearings are out
I’ve got a little magnetic disc here and your spindle is out I wipe everything
down with a clean rag and then I actually go through and I clean the
spindle with a little dab of rubbing alcohol I also clean the cups inside the
hub with a little bit of rubbing alcohol on a rag and then I actually soak these
little ball bearings you know a small cup of rubbing oil and just kind of
shake them to break away grease off of them then we’ll go through my news all right so we’ve got everything all
cleaned up and ready to go back together and the first thing is first is you got
to grease these cups before you can put your bearings so I use a grease gun you
can do this by hand using a small bit of actual bicycle specific grease it’s the
same thing I have in this gun this is just a little bit cleaner and what you
need to do is you need to lower these down in there now that grease is also
expose ball bearings in place while we are getting everything set before but
that shaft thank you as you can see I’ve got it really loaded up we’re gonna do
now you should have nine of these bearings per side what you do is you put
them in on the outside and just kind of let them drop down into that crease thanks you’ll see they are stuck in a
crease what we do take spindle I just river that side-to-side and that
actually seats all the bearings in the outer race then very carefully you don’t
want to get grease on your row not a set of four pivots and flip the whole thing
over sit down on that and that’ll hold those in place while you get this side so those are all seated in there now
you’re gonna take that cone nut take that cone nut write it down on here and
be careful not to knock it those bearings down inside of the hub when you
do this all right so we’ve got our cone nut fully seated and now what we need to
do is I just crank it down until it’s super tight using my cone wrench and
then I back it off a little bit don’t get a couple of turns out of it you’ll
hardly be able to spin it but it will still spin if it’s rough I double check
just to make sure everything got seated properly however this one seems to be
spinning pretty good and I back it off just a touch and then what we need to do
is install that spacer install that nut and we’ll actually use this to make sure
that that cone nuts stay locked in place it feels pretty good already and what
you want to make sure is there’s no side-to-side slap it doesn’t move inside
and out this actually feels pretty good so what I’m gonna do is hold this in
place with my comb wrench and then tighten that down against it
don’t let that cone rotate me do this alright just pretty good there’s no slap there you guys have it a super easy
project for lubricating the hubs on your Mongoose fat blank I strongly suggest
you do this before you take it out and ride it just to prevent from any sort of
premature wear or damage to your house I really appreciate you guys stopping in
and checking out this third episode in our my newest mini series the next one
I’ll be coming to you with a makeshift paint booth that you can make in your
garage so don’t forget to subscribe shoot a thumbs up and if you’ve got any
questions throw them down in that comment section below thanks

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  1. This is a remaster of the first video with improved audio. Let me know if it sounds good (better than the original at least). If so, I'll remaster the others that have sub par audio quality.

  2. I am fairly capable as a craftsman and a mechanic but was leery about pulling my Mongoose Hitch apart but I needed to increase that gear ratio from the original flywheel so climbing hills was not as much of a challenge. So I watched this installment about five times before attempting this task but everything worked like clockwork. I pulled the rear wheel followed your vid step by step and the only challenge was getting the spline socket onto the flywheel (googled other people's responses for this same issue; a couple of love taps with a rubber mallet). Aside from that start to finish in about 1 hour 15 minutes. Now she's well greased and the new super-low Shimano Flywheel has cut my work load in half. Going to go for the hydraulic brakes next week. Thank you for this tutorial!!!

  3. Handy video! I'm contemplating the Dolomite for a cheap fattie, and I know that the hubs should be greased since they come fairly dry from the factory.

    Good tips from your other videos too on how to make the bike more livable.

    If you're looking for a little better audio quality, they have some cheap lavalier mics that plug in using a 3.5 mm jack. Usually around $20. Works so well that I have to lower the volume in post.

    I subscribed, I think you'll do well, and I'm sorry that you got caught up in the 1,000 subscriber thing, that happened to my original channel. 913 Subscribers and completely demonetized. Extra NOT cool.

  4. Good video. I went one step further and replaced the ball bearings with grade 25 balls that I found on Amazon. I found a package of 5 common sizes of bike bearings with one 100 balls a piece for about 9 bucks. Cheap insurance I say. 🙂

  5. Easier to put the hub tool in a vice, lower the assembly down on it then just grab the outside diameter of the tire and spin it right off with no effort. If one has a vice of course

  6. Are you still in the game? Its been a while since you have put out a video. I enjoyed the series you did about the Mongoose hitch. Hope to see more someday.

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