Car Share: Growth Opportunities in Halifax

Car Share: Growth Opportunities in Halifax


It is such a pleasure that I got in my car and drove
here, all excited about today’s talk Julia Pelton, came to Halifax ten years ago for her undergrad degree in environmental science and international development studies. Nice combination there But she did it at another university somewhere else up the road, as we like to say [audience laughs] And then after that, she worked with Clean Nova Scotia for six years Now known as Clean Foundation. on environmental projects, environmental engagements, sustainable transportation, youth employment, and home energy efficiency Then, last year I guess, about 2015, started in the MBA program here at Sobey’s School of Business Also I am very pleased that she is the first student speaker in this term So that’s great. Connecting now in her MBA program environmental interests with social entrepreneurship aspects So Julia, people can see your title, I know its about car sharing, So I’ll turn it over to you. Thanks for coming. Perfect. Thanks everyone for coming today I know that the weather’s not great out there So just before we get started Like Tony said, my background is in environmental science and international development studies I worked at an environmental organization for six years one of the projects I worked on there was “retire your ride” So we got people out of their old vehicles and got them using more active forms of transportation and alternative forms of transportation, like car share So at that point I developed a relationship with the local car share company here called Car Share Halifax So when I entered into the MBA program here you have the opportunity to do either a consulting project or a research project And I really wanted to do something that was in the environmental field and that I could give back to the community So I went to Car Share Halifax and I said: Are there any business needs that you have that I could help research and fullfil my requirements for the program and, you know, get my degree, So that’s where this project really came about And Dr. Chantal She does a lot of work with social enterprises She’s pretty new to the Sobey School of Business But has a lot of background here so she was my supervisor throughout this process I will give you a quick agenda of what we are going to go over today So I’ll do a bit of background, kind of what Car Share Halifax is The research objectives for this project I’ll give you the highlights of the literater review because I am sure you won’t want to go through the nitty gritty of that The research methodology, findings, recommendations, and conclusion So, as we know, the world markets are reaching their capacity to govern resources in a sustainable manner And what’s happened in the last few years is that there’s been an emergence of the “sharing economy” This is where people have access to products or services through a network Examples of this would be Uber Cars or Airbnb The BIXI system in Montreal where you can rent bicycles for short periods of time And Car Sharing falls into this This is where people have access to a vehicle on an hourly or daily rate And they don’t have to own that vehicle. So the Car Share organization takes care of the insurance, the maintenance, and they manage that fleet of vehicles Car Share Halifax, they started in 2008 here in Halifax They now have over 1000 members They have 35 vehicles Those vehicles are across the Halifax Peninsula and in downtown Dartmouth Members have access to these vehicles 24 hours a day 7 days a week 365 days a year… and they pay only based on what their using. When I talked to Car Share Halifax, what they said they were having an issue with is getting into the multi residential building development sector. So if you’ve looked at other cities that have established car share networks What’s happening is that when developers are building either condos or apartment buildings there’s usually a set guide line that the municipality has that says for every unit that you’re building, you have to build one parking spot in the basement. or if it’s surface parking, or where ever. And so what other cities have been able to do through the municipal bylaws is the developers are able to get parking relaxation, so that they don’t have to build that 1:1 ratio if they incorporate car sharing into their building So this saves the developer money And through that savings, I should say, makes the apartments and condos more affordable for people that are living there here because those cost savings are being passed on to the consumer but it also grows the networking of car sharing within that community so it gives people more options about how they are getting around The whole philosophy, from Pam Cooley who is the president of Car Share Halifax is she wants to grow the Car Share Network here and have people have more multi mobile approach to transportation So when they can walk, they’re walking when they can bike, their biking, when they can take transit, they can take transit But when they need a vehicle, they have access to one and they don’t have to be paying all those expenses that come with vehicle ownership For a lot of people those cars are sitting in their driveway for the majority of the time So that’s really what this project is all about. So the research objectives we’re trying to figure out what is the value of car sharing in Halifax So what’s the value of car sharing for the municipality at that level whats the value for residential building developers on the peninsula downtown Dartmouth, but also whats the value with other cities that have car sharing and then we wanted to use this information to identify and inform business growth opportunities for the local car share organization Is everyone with me? Does this make sense? ok, so just going little bit into the
literature review Car sharing started in the 1940s in Europe It came over across the pond in the 1990s and its grown tremendously in popularity So in Canada we have over 36,000 members with over 5,000 cars that
are shared and 20 operators In 2014, the growth of Car Share was 50% in Canada So its definitely a growing and emerging market. When you look at business models I’ll bring that up briefly, there are different kinds of car sharing The car sharing we have here in Halifax is called a round-trip car sharing so you pick up the location at one location, you use it to make all your trips, and then you have to return it to that location. there are other organizations and auto manufacturers that have one-way car sharing so you’ll pick up a car from one location, you could drive it across town for a meeting, park it there, And that’s fine. And there’s different rules with having it in a different geographical area but there are different models that exist out there When you’re looking at who’s doing car sharing Its pretty diverse Its 21-55 year olds Its people who are environmentally concerned, its people who have high education and are professionals and that don’t have a need for vehicles When you’re looking at user-groups, its neighbourhoods its collages its professionals that’s using them The motivation’s usually cost savings so you’re not paying that monthly leasing fee you’re not paying every time you have to take it to the shop. to get the tires switched, or whatever All those costs are maintained by the Car Share organization You are only paying for the car as you need it. So when you look at urban planning and Car Sharing, even though there are these distinct groups that use Car Sharing more, How the city is planned, and what the municipal polity is actually plays a bigger role on how popular Car Sharing is in that city By 2050, it estimated that the world’s urban population is going to grow from 3.4 billion to 6.4 billion So what that means is there’s going to be huge growth of urban centres and this threatens traffic patterns so getting people around. How do you get them from where they are working, to where their homes are, to other amenities it increases congestion, air pollution, and vehicle accidents So cities, as most of you know, are key drivers to climate change and Car Share provides a unique solution to mitigate some of those things Obviously its not going to be the silver bullet But it will help mitigate some of the issues as urban density increases. When we look at municipal policies, Like they said, there are other cities that have incorporated parking relaxations in their by laws So that developers can reduce the amount of parking that they have to build and incorporate car sharing When that happens, you actually see a larger growth of the car sharing network you have more amenities for the people in those communities because they have other ways of getting around Yes, increased public amenities, growth in car share organizations, and reduce the cost for the developers So over all the impacts of car share from the literature is that people drive less than people who have cars they are planning their transportation trips differently. they’re walking more, biking more they are taking public transportation more They also forgo the purchase of another vehicle much more than people who already have a vehicle who are not members and a lot of them sell their current vehicles So each car share car that’s on the road, reduces the number of vehicles by 4.6-20 vehicles So that’s what you’re taking off the road every time there’s a car share car out there. So that’s the literature of what what it’s saying So when we look at the research methodology that I used I used the “emergent design process” so what I was trying to figure out was other municipalities have these bylaws that exist it helps to grow the network of car share cars it helps developers that cost gets passed on in terms of the tenants So what I wanted to do and why I chose the emergent design process is that you are actually engaging the people and organizations that are part of the issue to find what the issues are and what the solutions are So through that I did a series of interviews with different car share organizations across Canada, I interviewed the car share organization here I interviewed two urban planners and then five residential building developers and through this I tried to figure out what is their perception of car sharing What are the enablers that allow them to incorporate car sharing, and what are the barriers that exist Through this I also needed to use grounded theory I am not an urban planner I haven’t dealt a lot with urban by laws This was a new territory for me So there is a lot of secondary research that I needed to go through to make sure I understood what the process was So through that I had secondary data so user municipal planning documents on land use bylaws I’m looking at the regional plan, on what Halifax is saying as a city What do we want to look like in the next five years, ten years, twenty years, And then through this analysis what I did I transcribed all the interviews I did and I used a software called Atlas TI and what I was able to do was code different themes that came out of the different state holder groups So I had the car share organization, I had the urban planners, and I had the residential building developers So I was enable to figure out whats really enabling this process and what are the barriers that exist So thats what I’ll go into right now. So when you are looking at the enablers and just remember that these were car share organizations across the country that do have policies in place to go to the residential development builder You need to have that… where people using this amenity exists. And that demand comes a lot when you have good forms of public transportation. Public transportation and car share go hand in hand. Because people have other ways they can get around and that they can be mobile and that they don’t have to reply on having their own vehicle. The financial incentives. So what I mean there is by giving the developers the financial incentive by not having the build as many parking spots, In Halifax, each parking cell costs 20-60 thousand dollars to build if you are digging under the ground So that depends on where in the city you’re doing it and what the substrate is but 20-60 thousand dollars So if you can get rid of ten parking spots, that’s a huge financial incentive for the developer, so they want to go through this process and city and car share to make this relationship happen so the financial incentive is huge. The policy of parking. so if there’s something stated in the bylaws “yes, these developers can get rid of this many parking spots” its much easier than trying to navigate the system and try to negotiate without those policies in place. The public benefit is huge You’re reducing the building cost, thats going to be passed on to the consumers for more affordable housing, but they also have more options of how they get around. And like I said, their relationship and negotiation, with those three parties the car share organizer, the city, developer, is instrumental in allowing these things to work and the over all value When you look at HRM planners it comes down to things like complete transportations so within the HRM regional planning they are looking at “how do we get people around more effectively?” This is something this city wants to do and right now you’ve probably heard that they’re looking at how much metro transit is, and they are trying to redesign some of those processes so we get people around more effectively here One thing that’s come up recently is density bonus-ing. Density bonusing is a tool that a municipality can use that falls outside of what the bylaws are So, if a developer wants to build a ten story building next to Saint Mary’s University, But they bylaws only say “No, you can only build an eight story building” what the developer can do is go through something called density bonusing. and for the ability to build those extra two stories, they have to give something back to the public So that can be maybe building a park for kids across the street, or maybe its doing a public garden, or maybe its incorporating a car share car that can then be used by the greater community. So what Halifax is doing right now, is doing an entire study of what density bonusing is going to look like here. and they are looking at other municipalities and trying to figure out what the guidelines are that they’ve incorporated to their density bonus and how that will look here If you look at the HRM charter, There is a lot of flexibility to bring in density bonuses When we look at land use bylaws in Halifax, we still live in a very archaic system, so amalgamation at the HRM in 1985 I think it was maybe 1996… and we still have 23 different bylaws that guide our city depending on what area you are in and so it makes it difficult for developers that aren’t working in only one zone but working throughout the city Whereas you can use something like density bonusing in any of those areas So it’s an interesting tool their doing their research for that. In terms of the parking reductions, and the policy, out city wants to be greener, They want to get people around more, they want to be encouraging small businesses but its not coming out in the building level yet they are saying a lot of things but they are not necessarily walking the walk and they want those public benefits When you look at the residential building developers, you see a lot of young professionals moving downtown on the peninsula or downtown Dartmouth. They want that financial incentive. They don’t want to pay for extra parking spots if there aren’t going to be people there. So one of the developers I talked to he mostly caters to a student population, and he has 15-18% use of his parking lot at any given time. However, with him building a new building right now he’s going to the city and saying “I am going to cater to the same clientele, I know I need only X amount of parking spots, but the bylaws say I need to increase them to this amount, and the city is saying I have to do 1:1 ratio or 1:0.75 ratio…” So he knows he’s going to have huge vacancy, and that the cost of building those spots is going onto the student population that he’s renting to Anyways. Financial incentive is a big one. Municipal support. They say that the municipality is in support of innovative solutions, to try and get people around, whether that’s happening on the ground or not is a different story. Parking policy plays a huge role in terms of having those ratios and what they have to build and they want the value added. Most developers are sitting there and they want to keep their tenants in their buildings. They don’t want to have vacancies. So the more services they can provide, the better for them So what I did with all this information, is there’s essentially different network diagrams, that show the relationship between each of these points and then what I did, is that I found the common themes and created an overarching networking diagram that looks like this. So you have the enablers here, at the top and what you’re seeing is, contributing to incorporating car share at the multi residential building development level is you need these things in place. You need complete transportation. People need to have other modes of getting around, and they can’t just be relying on single occupancy vehicles. There needs to be a parking policy in place. That the developers can follow, that the car share organization can follow, that the municipality can follow Urban planning is a big thing. So where does out city want to go, what does it look like… and then you also need a little bit of flexibility and support in there, you need to figure out what the value is. And this downtown lifestyle is really important So, like I mentioned before, Car Share Halifax only operates on the peninsula and downtown Dartmouth and we know that these places are getting denser in terms of people living there Car Share isn’t offered on the outskirts yet, maybe it will, but we need the downtown lifestyle, we need to be focusing on these downtown core areas For this to happen there. So this is what the over all enablers look like In terms of the barriers the developers had a lot more issues with incorporating these sort of practices than the other two groups The car share organizations, what they saw as barriers was competitions In a lot of other cities there isn’t just one car share organization, there’s multiple. So they are fighting to be able to get into these new buildings Its also a risk So if you sign a contract with the municipality or the developer that they are going to reduce the parking, and you’re going to put a car share car in there, that buildings not going to come online until 12-24 months So are you sure that that space and that location is going to be where you want that vehicle in 12-24 months. So there is some risk there And then, the parking policy so whether it’s actually you know, conducive helping both the developers and car share company come to an agreement to HRM planners… there’s a lot of inconsistencies in terms of what the plans are and whats actually happening on the ground. So if you look at the regional plan, if you look at the functional planning strategy, they’re at odds with each other a lot and the process can be complicated For developers, there’s different ways you get a development permit Some of it has to go through public consultation, some of it doesn’t some of it is as of right, some of it isn’t And so there is no set one way that developers are able to build their buildings So with the residential building developers, its a long process to get those building applications in place When I was talking to them, they said: “yeah, car share sounds great. We can add this amenity to the people who are renting here… or have bought these condos and the surrounding community…” But it is such a long process. And when they had have other changes they want to do that go against the bylaws so, the planning documents in their area, they don’t want to add parking onto it It needs to be easy for them they have a million things that they’re thinking about and car share comes really low on the list so it needs to be a very easy process There’s a financial expense in terms of these projects. They are very expensive to get of the ground They take years to have people From the time that you’re breaking ground, to to the time that people are there, there’s a huge financial expense that comes there so they need to make sure that that pay off is in enough time that it makes sense to go through the process of trying to reduce how much parking they have They found there is a lack of leadership at the municipal level So some developers and planners would say “yes! We want to do this, this is great” and then when it came to the end of the day and a signature was needed on the building permit, it was really different what those two sides were So definitely political obstacles and bridge of policies So when you look at the network diagram for this one it looks a little bit different But the common themes that are coming through with all three groups are the political obstacles, there’s lack of support, The process is complicated and confusing, and the policy isn’t there for this to happen in HRM right now So, what I found with all this is, for my recommendations and conclusions We need to develop stronger relationships. It seems like people are not talking to one another car share needs to develop stronger relationships with the developers that are here and with the planners that are here, to show case how this has been successful in other cities and they need to sit in a room, I think, and show: these are the pros and cons of trying to reduce the number of parking stalls, and why incorporating car share into this process is actually a huge benefit to not only the building, but to the community Halifax, I think we need to do pilot projects, people can be a bit slow and not as progressive to get on board with innovative things Not that car share is that innovative, its been around since the 1940s, but, I think we need to test it would with maybe a smaller building see how it works, and then show how this works for developers of difference sizes and different locations and then density bonusing This is the key of how to get these parking placements at the municipal level We’re not going to change bylaws right now they’ve been trying to do a centre plan for the last five years and it still hasn’t come out So I think density bonusing is an option that you can incorporate car share at the building level without having to go through a lot of hurdles. its the easiest way to do it Overall, there’s really complex relationships that exist here The other network diagrams, there’s lines everywhere, and much more notes to them. But the great thing is there are success factors that exist so that means there is a way we can do this in Halifax We can encourage car sharing, we can encourage that we are not building as much parking, we can encourage higher density on the peninsula and downtown Dartmouth and hopefully make our city a little bit better So, that’s my presentation, That’s what I worked on. [audience applause] TONY: We have time for questions and comments and any discussion AUDIENCE: You commented about two points. First of all It seems to me, if I were a developer building a building, It would depend very much who will be moving in and you mentioned about students, and others who might… there’s such a range On the other hand there are expensive condos donwtown that presumably wouldn’t be so much the student market I can imagine a situation where the actual places that I am trying to sell as a developer, the unit, would be higher, if I could say: you have a guaranteed parking spot Now this is not for the students, maybe others, I don’t know, So the phycology and the financial aspect of being able to promise that, which I gather the city is saying has to be the case anyway, And again I would think the developers would be ambivalent, and you highlighted the cost savings of not having a parking spot for everybody, but I was wondering if you could comment on the opposite side, Maybe the developers are going to lose a bunch of money and the prices are going to drop because they, compared to their next door neighbour, are not providing parking spots JULIA: I think that’s a really good point When I was interviewing developers I interviewed a pretty big range of developers there’s some that only targeted that student demographic some that were exclusively in the condo market some that did small scale projects, and others that were doing large scale projects and I think… what I heard from them was there’s areas and there’s a demographic that yes every single person or every single unit needs one, maybe two parking stalls. There’s other developers that know they have an 15-18% of how much parking is actually being used in their parking lots And so I think it depends on the developer the developer knows their demographic more Another example I heard from a developer is They had to charge… they had just a small condo building It was only about 6-8 units and it cost the people buying those condos an extra $60,000 to have that parking spot and that was something the developer was pushing on the individuals as a selling feature for when they were going to sell that condo afterwards And I think there is a little bit of a mind shift we need to do as a culture I think we’ve been very dependent on having vehicles and mostly single occupancy vehicles to take us to and from work and all those places. and I think that, you know, Pam’s philosophy, when you can walk, walk. when you can bike, bike, when you can take transit, take transit when you need a car, here’s a car and that doesn’t work for everyone, but it does work for some people, and I think and it’s trying to figure out what are those situations and where does this make the most sense There’s an aspect of this research, when I was talking to developers, and trying to figure out what their parking vacancy was most had some sort of vacancy One of the developers downtown said that they rent out those parking stalls to people who are communting from outlying areas and working downtown and they are able to rent them out on a monthly rate on whatever is around the market price, so that was around $100 the payback period of renting out a parking spot at $100, when it costs you $60,000 to build it you’re still looking at 10-15 years to pay if off So, there’s a lot of… There’s a lot of things going on Its very dynamic as to what those decisions are and I think I highlighted more the student population because that was such a great example of where this would really work But you’re right, there are some buildings this would not work and it would not be beneficial for the developer to try and reduce their parking spots Does that answer your question? AUDIENCE: So are you looking at the building to concur the cost of the car share in the…insurance for that car share, and to have the car share readily available at the building for whoever needs it and what would be the costs of having the parking spot there So would the person rent the parking spot, then rent the car from car share, and then fill it up with gas as they return to the parking spot? JULIA: That’s a great question So, how the car share organization works here and every model’s a little bit different, is you pay a membership cost and then every time you rent a vehicle, so if you wanted to use a car from noon until five o-clock today you’d see which cars are available and you’d rent it for that time period so there’s an hourly and a per kilometer rate that comes with that cost and so, at the end of the day… I’m not sure what that would come up to but… whatever the total is, that includes the rental for that parking spot, the insurance, the maintenance, the gas, everything. the windshield washer fluid… the air in the tires. So there’s only one cost on the member In terms of the car share organization working with the developer they need to figure out a way to negotiate that parking spot. so is the developer just give that parking spot to car share, as an inkind donation, or are they going to charge them a monthly rate In Vancouver, what actually happens is that they have an entire formula they say “if the developer has to build X number of stalls, and we’re going to reduce that so that they build ten less, so as to incorporate car share” the city actually mandates the developer to purchase those two vehicles at the building level Those two vehicles have to be in an open air parking lot So they have to be accessible to people in the community they can’t be behind barriers So there are some logistical things that come with it, in terms of where those vehicles are located that the community at large can access them But the developer in Vancouver, how it’s seen is, the developer has to purchase those vehicles, because their still realizing a cost savings by reducing the number of parking cells by ten that’s still in their favour, after they’ve bought two vehicles Does that make sense? Its kind of a run around way. Here, I don’t know what that would look like I think its getting into the room with the stakeholders and figuring out: OK, so the developers saving a hundred thousand dollars, because we’re reducing how much parking space they have with that savings, do they need to purchase the vehicle, do they just need to provide a stall, do they have to give memberships to everyone in their building? So there’s a lot of different ways you can play with that savings in a way thats still beneficial for the developer and still growing the car share network through the community AUDIENCE: Is it viable for the car share to concur the cost of the windshield wiping fluid, oil… JULIA: all of it. Yes. That’s all on them. Its not on the person using the vehicle Its suppose to be as easy for members as it can be So essentially you have a fob. You book online, you go to the vehicle, you fob in, the car unlocks you take the car, you drive it where ever you bring it back, you fob out and then it will charge you for that time period there’s other models, like those one way models that you’re only paying per minute that you’re in the vehicle, because you’re taking it across town and so it depends here, you’re only paying for the time and per kilometres that you’re using, you don’t have to pay for anything else. AUDIENCE: If you want the car to go from here to cross town, but you’re not coming back with the car, does car share go pickup the car and deliver it back to the … JULIA: No, it would be the member’s responsibility to take it back. We have a round trip model here. and its different in every city The one way system, for example in Calgary, Car To Go is owned by Mercedes Benz They have 100-150 smart cars and what they say, that in this geographical area you can move and rent these cars for as long as you need them You can drive it across town, pick it up in one location and drop it off at another location and I think that part of the reason we haven’t seen that one way car share model here is that we don’t quite have the membership or density to be able to do it We only have 35 cars here So I don’t think it would serve the needs of the consumer if people were pickup it up and dropping it off at different locations within the peninsula and downtown Dartmouth but maybe we’ll get there some day Where Car Share cars exist right now is Halifax peninsula and downtown Dartmouth so that’s the only geographic location that they have right now AUDIENCE: A friendly car share would be to put those cars where they are needed so would it not be beneficial to put those cars everywhere, not just Dartmouth and Halifax JULIA: Ideally. But we only have 1000 members So they can only support 35 cars If we had 10 000 members, you’d see the network grow into other areas But we haven’t reached that tipping point yet maybe one day? AUDIENCE: I am wondering about the different classes of membership for example, I’m going off a little big but I’ll come back to my point A few years back, SMU had some partnership with Nova Scotia Power. They had an electric car here on campus for anybody on campus to use You’d register through security and so forth book the car, do whatever you needed to do, and that was really nice to have available on campus you if you’re going on a research project, or want to pick up something for school… and it was used quite well and then I think facilities stopped doing that due to costs, or something of the program and that was quite disappointing, because it meant that all of us had to incorporate that cost under the individual budgets then of that having to rent cars or what have you and that really increased the over all cost So coming back to my point, and maybe think during your presentation is it possible to have an institutional membership hospitals, universities, organizations, or so forth that, say they have this membership for two or three cars on campus or on site, and that might be a good way to lead people to be more comfortable to car sharing and that kind of program and it may be more acceptable than using the one at their home I know people here on campus would certainly use one. JULIA: Yes. So I don’t work for Car Share Halifax I’m not sure exactly how their memberships work but I do know there is an institutional and business membership that… you know, when I worked at Clean Nova Scotia, we had one as an organization and we used it for meetings and things like that and it got billed right to the organization so you didn’t have to take your own vehicle, you didn’t have to worry about renting a car So I know that that exists In terms of having vehicles on campus What an awesome idea I think that’s great in terms of having people become more familiar in terms of seeing it but thats a relationship between the university and the car share company and with outside of the scope with this research, but in terms of my literature review colleges, hospitals, they, in other cities, are really using car share services So I think thats definitely another opportunity I think its a business thing that I don’t know how it works completely… so… AUDIENCE: Do you have any suggestions on how to move forward on that, to convince the university to go that route? JULIA: I could talk to you after wards and get you in touch with Pam, I’ll grab your e-mail and get you in contact with Pam, because I think that is a great idea. AUDIENCE: Just a comment… may the School of Environment could purchase a membership? AUDIENCE: yeah! Put it on the logo, “School of Environment Car”. AUDIENCE: I know a couple developers are already partnering with Car Share Halifax downtown Did you talk to any of those developers specifically, and what’s their opinions, what’s their questions do they like it? Are they happy? JULIA: I did. I talked to five that had already some kind of relationship I think two of those developers already had vehicles ready on their site and the other two had no idea what car share was they probably understood it was an amenity that people would like, but they weren’t really sure what that meant Sorry, am I answering your question? AUDIENCE: The ones that have it. Are they happy with the program? JULIA: They are happy, yes. AUDIENCE: Are residents renting them out? JULIA: I didn’t get into detail on whether it was the residence renting them, or whether its the surrounding community I didn’t go into that data at all Essentially how it works, and this might fit into your question a little bit into where the locations are going… Car Share has the ability to look at what the demand is, what cars are being most used, and that people can say: we really want a car here So other cities, Vancouver, for instance, they have a whole algorithm that tells them this is where the demand is, this is exactly where we want a car this is how we want to grow it it hasn’t been that sophisticated here just because we don’t have the same sort of numbers as Vancouver It also means that because there are only 35 cars, sometimes vehicles are getting moved around, because you know, the demand just isn’t there at a certain location, so they move it to where it is So I think that it’s still kind of… …I don’t want to say trial and error it is still a learning process here AUDIENCE: Would you say it is actually bringing in new residence, that it’s a good parking tool… JULIA: I didn’t hear that at all No, but when I walked into one of them, they had the Car Share pamphlet there I don’t know that they’re using it as a selling feature I just don’t know AUDIENCE: as a side personal note, I have a rental downtown and there’s a waiting list for a parking spot, so there is a demand for parking and they have car share as well JULIA: Interesting. So they didn’t build enough So in that situation, are you forced to find parking… AUDIENCE: There’s street parking JULIA: What about the winter? Ok. Good to know. Yeah, so there’s all kinds of shapes and sizes that come with people that are living in these buildings AUDIENCE: As a quick follow up Why is there a waiting list if the rule is you have to have a parking spot for every resident? JULIA: Let me clarify that a little bit. The one to one ratio, that’s different everywere so every single bylaw is differnt. Maybe it says .7:1 .8:1 or .5:1 Downtown Halifax is actually a very unique example, and there is no parking requirement whatsoever. Its completely up to the developer to say how much parking they want So there is one development that is going up right now that’s going to have zero parking So that’s very unique. Its a very small geographical area, outside of that there is a ratio, and its not always 1:1 it depends on height, size, location, bylaws, old bylaws… AUDIENCE: You can see this city’s rational, that they don’t want people scrambling for street parking JULIA: But then there’s other cities that are trying to minimize all of the parking in the downtown centre, because they don’t want to encourage people to drive. or you see a city like… I was talking to my brother-in-law the other day, he’s in Calgary It costs $600 a month to park your car in downtown Calgary right now because there’s such a shortage so its better for him to take the bus there So there’s different situations to encourage people how their getting around, how their commuting, Every city does it differently AUDIENCE: We talked a lot about developing and infrastructure and how you’re incorporating Car Share into that but have you talked about pre-developed buildings how they go about already established places and incorporating car share into those JULIA: So that’s an ongoing relationship that the car share organization has with different developers so as your question to what developers are saying now a lot of car share cars are happening there you also come into the difficulty when its an established building of whether there’s open air parking that you can put those cars so that it can be accessed by the rest of the community. If they have underground parking there’s no where to put a car except for behind a gate, then it decreases the security of that building because you’re letting the public into a locked garage so there’s difficulties that come with it. there’s some situations that it comes really easy because they have a location within the development that they can park a car. Its all very unique, and its about that relationship building its about one-on-one, and the car share company talking with the developers in those situations and figuring if it works or the car share organization talking to the school and figuring out how this works and where we put this what does the negotiation process look like who’s paying for the parking stall is it a donation? are we promoting it as a school? are we doing whatever… so those things come in at the business level and how they want to do their marketing and brand themselves AUDIENCE: Just a speculation the autonomous car thats coming how does this play into the car share model? Even GM last week said they’re moving towards car share at a certain point in the future how does that fit into the local plans? parking? JULIA: I don’t have a clue. However, I had a very long discussion with one of the planners locally and he thinks that cars that drive themselves are going to be the transition of people getting out of their own vehicle so he feels that’s the next progression you don’t have car share vehicles anymore that you have these autonomous cars that you hop in with three other people to commute to work, and that people aren’t driving anymore I don’t know what that’s going to look like but maybe? Maybe people don’t own cars anymore? They just call a number and figure out who’s going to pick you up and go, I have no idea. AUDIENCE: Which is essentially UBER model JULIA: So it’s kind of like a mix of both of them what do you think would happen? AUDIENCE: well… I think this is going to happen in the next ten years Most people don’t even have their own car, just pull up an app and say I need a car here and it will take you where you need to go so then that releases all the individual parking spots there will just be holding areas for cars circling on the streets JULIA: and then if your using an electric car and not using fossil fuels and you know, there’s other benefits that can come in terms of the environmental compensation AUDIENCE: A developer can’t just purchase a car and spot thats just used for their own…. JULIA: They can They definitely can An example of where that takes place is Winnepeg If the developer’s going through a parking relaxation process with the municipality the municipality says you need to have a car share vehicle for this parking relaxation No where in that contract does it say that you have to go with the car share organization or other organizations that are in the town However, its 9 times out of 10, maybe higher than that, that its easier for the developer to go with the car share organization because they are not in the fleet management business So they can just wipe their hands and say this car share provider’s going to provide this this car and this spot and I don’t have to take care of it but I am meeting the contract terms that I have with the municipality in terms of reducing parking spaces AUDIENCE: and that’s why it has to be in open air JULIA: Open air is ideal all the time but if a developer said for whatever reason I only want to have a car for this development and I’m going to provide that and have different keys at the front desk and people and sign it out That’s how it works in Winnipeg I don’t know if thats actually happened, because the car share organization I talked to there said the developers always went with them because its an easier solution for them But they could do it themselves AUDIENCE: That seems like potentially a nice model for a large building not to have it open air necessarily but to have in their parking garage underground, to have another car sitting there just for their residence and they know its not somebody coming in from outside Its just there. To me that would be a selling point for living in that particular building But you’re saying thats prohibited in the Halifax model JULIA: No, a developer could do that right now AUDIENCE: I mean with car share JULIA: Car Share Halifax would not come on board with that AUDIENCE: But I don’t see why they wouldn’t be more flexible and say: yeah we can put one of our cars in there to cater to that building and see how it works JULIA: I think its…. you’d have to talk to Car Share, but I think its based on how much its being used so if that building is only using it at 25% capacity, but you know the ten block radius is going to increase it to another 25% and that car’s being used at 50% if its opened up to the whole community then that’s under car share’s perspective But I don’t know all the numbers behind it thats only me speculating TONY: Anyone else? OK great Thank you so much Julia JULIA: You’re welcome [applause]

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