Building my Sync’r Carbon Hardtail from Parts

Building my Sync’r Carbon Hardtail from Parts


This is Diamondback’s new Hardtail, the
Sync’r Carbon. It’ll be available later this year, but
for now it’s just a frame with no parts on it. Diamondback hasn’t worked all that stuff
out yet. If you’ve ever built a bike from the frame
up, you know it’s easy to forget parts and tools. I mean look at all this stuff! It’s inevitable that you’ll forget a seat
post clamp, grips, or any number of specialty wrenches, and you’re sure to find out when
it’s too late to do anything about it. But today we’re seeing this through to the
end. This will not be a detailed tutorial, but
rather a synopsis of this bike build. Some of these parts are from my official channel
sponsors, Diamondback Bikes, Box Components, and Slime Sealant. The balance of the parts were contributed
by other friends of this channel. To be transparent, thank these companies for
their support, and reduce the number of “what part was that?” comments, I’ll go into detail as the build
progresses. With that said, prepare to geek out. It’s new bike day, and this time we get
to build it. The first thing I like to do is set up the
wheels. These TR41 wheels were provided by Box Components. Also provided by Box is this 50 tooth cassette. As with any metal on metal interface, we’ll
apply grease first. From there the cassette just slides on and
stays in place with a lock ring, torqued down with a cassette tool and big wrench. Now to install these 2.8” Havoc Pro tires
provided by Kenda. Because these rims and tires are tubeless
ready I’m leaving a section open for the sealant. A lot of people ask if this is the same Slime
available at auto parts stores, and the answer is no! This is their tubeless formula, available
online and at bike shops. It’s not always easy, but with a little
gorilla action most tires can be installed without a lever, reducing the risk of damaging
the bead or rim tape. With a blast of air the tires snap into place,
and we’re ready to mount the brake rotors. I’m using 180mm slotted rotors, provided
by TRP. But but but, you’re not supposed to use
a drill because—I know. I’m just screwing these in most of the way
with the drill, and then torquing them down manually. Nothing’s gonna explode, it’ll be fine. Next I’ll lightly clamp the frame into the
stand so we can get to the good stuff. Let’s start with the bottom bracket which
was provided by Raceface. Although this frame is carbon, the bottom
bracket shell is machined from aluminum, so we can apply grease and thread these bearings
in like normal. I’m using one spacer on the drive side to
get the width right. And of course I’m missing the proper wrench
for this bottom bracket. So I’ll just do what everyone else does. Also provided by Raceface are these Next R
carbon cranks and this 30 tooth narrow wide chainring. Paired with that 50 tooth cassette, I should
be able to climb real slow. From there, the crankset slides into the bottom
bracket, and over the spindle with the turn of this 8mm hex bolt. Next up more bearings. I bought a headset online but forgot to order
races, so I robbed them off another bike to make this build happen. After applying some carbon paste and lining
up the races with a mallet, I’ll use a press to sink them into the frame. In the absence of a crownrace tool, I’ll
carefully tap it down on to the fork with the plastic side of my mallet. Let’s talk about this fork. This bike was originally getting an MRP Ribbon
coil, but it didn’t show up on time for this build. That was my fault. So I glommed a Fox 36 off another bike, took
it to my friends at Squatch, and had them reduce the travel from 160mm to 140mm. The fact that they had the parts in stock
and were able to verify over the phone that they’d fit, is a testament to how good of
staff Squatch has. The result was a great fork in the perfect
configuration for this frame, but I’m still hoping my Ribbon will arrive in time to travel
with this bike. Installing a fork and installing a headset
are actually one in the same task. The big bearing goes on the bottom, the small
bearing on top, then the compression ring, then the dust cover. Finally the spacers, the stem, and the top
cap. Now we’re ready for these Box One downhill
bars, but first we need to reduce their width to 770. For that, I’ll clamp them into the workstand,
line up my hacksaw, and prepare to careful. According to the safety enthusiasts in my
comment section, carbon dust is like anthrax. With the bars in place, we can get to the
fun stuff. I only received the derailleur hanger this
morning, which luckily came with the right bolts. For shifting we’ll be using the Box Two
11 speed derailleur, a less costly version of it’s Box One counterpart. It works with that 50 tooth cassette, features
an all new clutch, and signature box styling. I’m excited to give this a long term test. To string the drivetrain together, I’m installing
this rose gold Box Hex Lab chain, which seems to be the right size already for this gear
combo. Now we can set up the cockpit, starting with
all the levers and these Box One grips. First we’ll set up the dropper post which
is internally routed. I’m using a Raceface Turbine R 150mm post
and thumb lever. Thanks to this access port in the bottom of
the frame, hooking it all up is pretty straightforward. With a seat post installed, we don’t need
to clamp the workstand on the frame anymore. Now for some stopping power, courtesy of TRP. These Slate G Spec 4 piston brakes have tons
of modulation, use mineral oil, and come with really really long hoses out of the box. Of course, they also come with everything
you need to shorten them up. Just unscrew the hose, trim it to size, jam
in a new insert, slide on the bolt, and then the olive. I’ll bleed these later since we most certainly
introduced some air into the system. On to the calipers which just bolt on to the
frame and fork. To align them, leave the bolts slightly loose
to allow the caliper to move, hold down the brake lever to center it up, and then while
continuing to squeeze the lever, tighten the bolts to hold the caliper in place. Perfect. While we’re working on the cockpit it’s
time to dial the shifting. Back at the derailleur, these limit screws
determine how far up or down the cassette you’re allowed to shift. The b screw determines how close the upper
pulley can get to the gears. This bolt holds the cable in place, and this
barrel adjuster at the shifter can make fine adjustments to the tension. Of course, it shifts like a dream. And with that we’re down to fine details,
like adjusting the angles of the levers, and installing all the other stuff I forgot about. There are also these pedals. Raceface was clean out of stock on black Chesters,
so yeah. I haven’t even crashed this bike yet, and
it’s already black and blue. And look what just showed up. My Ribbon coil fork. Alright, let’s do this. And with just a few hiccups, we have built
a murderous hardtail. If you could rank all the bikes in the world
by beauty, I’m positive the top spot would be taken by a hardtail. They just look so freaking good. But we can only stare at this bike for so
long. I would have done a real trail test for you
guys, but it’s getting late and I need to pack this thing up for a trip! By the time this video airs, I’ll be pushing
this hardtail to its limits in the Rocky Mountains. Stay tuned next week for an all day ride on
the longest day of the year. Oh yeah, and let me know what you think of
the blue pedals. Thanks for riding with me today, and I’ll
see you next time.

Only registered users can comment.

  1. I use my dropper post as a crappy full sus bc I’m not allowed a full sus so whenever I go down jumps I use the dropper and I ended up breaking is 😂😂

  2. I just watched Sam pilgrim build his new dirt jumper and as a mechanic I lost a little something just like every time he works on his bikes so I had to come watch this to calm down lmfao

  3. 9:00 Always thought the star-fangled nut was supposed to be placed further down the steerer tube than what looks like "flush" here. Am I wrong?

  4. I don't know why, but I always come back to watch this video from time to time. It's one of my favourites from Seth!

  5. What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? What part was that? sorry Seth…

  6. Nice accent piece You a man riding a hard town I ride a specialized pitch comp Mind at 27.5size rims do you ride If you ride 26" WTB Velocir raptors Those are really good for the trail you were on in your last video In the rocky mountains

  7. The blue pedals look great with the bike but looked even better with the other forks because of the blue caps 👍👍👍

  8. Pedals is good contrast sometimes with things that is to much and somethings too little bud Symmetry can be off nothing is perfect so imperfection is good.

  9. I am getting parts to build my own mountain bike now. Thanks for this assembly video so I have some more references to look into when I am working on it. Still waiting for my carbon frame to arrive before I can really order other parts I want. …..or the sizes of those parts will be very wrong….

  10. Nothing wrong with using a drill driver to do up bolts, however your driver has a clutch to prevent over tightening use it, then you can torque up, I use mine on 2,3 or 4 never on drill mode

  11. Imagine having enough money to o buy some of the best bikes in the world but getting most of the bikes and parts for free

  12. My fave quote: "Oh-god-oh-god-oh-god". I've never built I bike, one of the things I always wonder is how interchangeable all of the parts are. Like are all derailer hangers shaped the same? Do all brake calipers fit the mounting holes on all bikes? Are all fork "steerer tubes" the same shape and size or how many sizes are there? Why did you have to cut yours? How did you know how much to cut? Are crank bearings all the same or how do you know what sizes to use?
    If these were cars nearly everything would work the same but everything would be a different size and in a slightly different location. Bikes…I have no clue.

  13. I dont understand the benefit of tubeless tires. Does it not just make you more prone to flats? If you have tubless and your tire gets a hole or cut, youre done right? If you have a tube installed and you tire gets a cut or tear, but your tube is untouched, youre still rind fine.

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